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How to Fill Out Your FAFSA

Filling out your FAFSA is an important first step towards getting financial aid. Here you’ll find information on exactly how to fill it out: there’s an instructional video below, as well as contact information for help filling it out and Frequently Asked Questions about the FAFSA.

There are two basic steps to the FAFSA process:

1. First, get a PIN

A PIN is a unique number given to you by the government that functions as your signature when you fill out your FAFSA online. (Filling it out online is the fastest and easiest way to go.) Go here to apply for your PIN.

2. Next, fill out your FAFSA online

You can find the FAFSA here.

A Step-By-Step Instructional Video on the FAFSA click here

 

Resources for Help With Filling Out Your FAFSA

  1. The TIU-Florida Financial Aid office offers on-campus assistance every Monday through Friday from 9:00am to 3:00pm.
  2. Toll-free phone assistance is available at 1-877-477.4848
  3. You can email any questions to FLfinaid@tiu.edu.
  4. Information on other sources of financial aid can be found here.

FAFSA Frequently Asked Questions

Why fill out a FAFSA?

Why all the questions?

How do I find out what my Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is?

How much aid will I get?

When do I get the aid?

Where can I get more information on student aid?

 

Why fill out a FAFSA?

The FAFSA (the Free Application for Federal Student Aid) is the first step in the financial aid process. You use it to apply for federal student financial aid, such as grants, loans, and work-study. In addition, the state of Florida uses information from the FAFSA to award state grants.

 

Why all the questions?

The Federal Student Aid Office enters your responses to the FAFSA questions into a formula from the Higher Education Act of 1965, as amended. The result is your Expected Family Contribution (EFC). The EFC measures your family’s financial strength and is used to determine your eligibility for federal student aid. The state of Florida, and any schools you list, may also use some of your responses. They will help determine if you may be eligible for school or state aid in addition to federal aid.

 

How do I find out what my Expected Family Contribution (EFC) is?

The Federal Student Aid Office will send you a report called a Student Aid Report, or SAR, by mail or by email. The SAR lists the information you reported on your FAFSA and will tell you your EFC. It is important to review your SAR when you receive it – make sure all of your information is correct, and make any necessary changes or provide additional information (if needed) as soon as possible.

 

How much aid do I get?

Your EFC, along with the rest of your FAFSA information, is made available to all the schools you list in step six of the FAFSA. The schools use your EFC to prepare a financial aid package to help meet your financial needs. Financial need is the difference between your EFC and your school’s cost of attendance (which can include living expenses), as determined by the school.

If you or your family has special circumstances that should be taken into account, contact your school’s financial aid office. Some examples of special circumstances are: unusual medical or dental expenses, or a large change in income from last year to this year.

 

When do I get the aid?

Any financial aid you are eligible to receive will be paid to you through your school. Typically, your school will first use the aid to pay tuition, fees, and room and board (if you’re living on campus). Any remaining aid is paid to you for your other expenses.

If you are eligible for a Federal Pell Grant, you may receive it for only one school for the same period of enrollment.

 

Where can I get more information on student aid?

The best place for information about student financial aid is the financial aid office at the school you plan to attend. (Here’s information on how to contact TIU-Florida’s Financial Aid office.) They can tell you everything you need to know about student aid available from your state, their school, and other sources.